Frank Sinatra Albums

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Frank Sinatra Albums 2017-06-10T00:19:33+00:00

America Dances Program

Frank Sinatra Harry James America Dances Program

On 19th of July, 1939, Frank Sinatra and Harry James‘s band had a broadcast, America Dances Program. And we can still listen to it after 76 years.

Frank Sinatra and Harry James Complete Recordings

Frank Sinatra Harry James Complete Recordings

An album of Frank Sinatra songs when he was working with Harry James Orchestra. Harry James and his Orchestra, featuring Frank Sinatra, by Columbia Records.

The Song Is You (Box Set) – CD 1

Frank Sinatra The Song Is You

The Song Is You features songs of Frank Sinatra when he was singing with Tommy Dorsey orchestra. Here we take a look at first CD of this album set.

All Alone

Frank Sinatra All Alone Album 1962

All Alone is a beautiful concept album of Frank Sinatra from Reprise Records in 1962.

Cycles

Frank Sinatra Cycles Album 1968

Cycles is an album of Frank Sinatra, released in 1968, by Reprise Records. The songs are arranged by Don Costa.

L.A. Is My Lady

Frank Sinatra LA Is My Lady Album 1984 Quincy Jones

L.A. Is My Lady is the album Frank Sinatra recorded in the year 1984. Quincy Jones contributed to the L.A. Is My Lady album as the arranger and producer, and the album is released by Warner Bros.

11 Comments

  1. charles thain November 17, 2011 at 20:17 - Reply

    i feel that frank when he retired in 1971 should have stayed retired and not made a comeback. from the mid 1970s his voice suffered a decline and cannot be compared to his supreme singing in the 40s, 50s, and 60s. why did he comeback? the youth of today hear duets and other recent recordings and probably think that is the real sinatra. i always tell them to listen and study sinatra on capitol.

    • Juan Carlos Sánchez June 27, 2013 at 10:25 - Reply

      Had Frank Sinatra not made his comeback you and me and the whole world would have been denied the pleasure of such beautiful songs such as “Didn’t We”, What Are You Doing The Rest of Your Life?”, It Had to Be You” and so many others. I’m sure glad he decided to go back into the recording studio!

    • Samuel Chell January 9, 2017 at 23:51 - Reply

      This is a comment from sheer ignorance. Before he retired, Frank tried to meet the new low standard in pop music, which had been taken away from professional composers like Cole Porter and Richard Rodgers and handed over to the new guitar-playing singer-songwriters like the Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, Glen Campbell and Willie Nelson. It was a “populist revolution,” producing reductive music by one amateurish performer after the other, with depressing results to the record sales of someone of Sinatra’s high standards (his last couple of albums sold in the hundreds, not tens of thousands, wtih “Watertown” the nadir, imo).

      A number of “traditional” professional singers persisted but with depressing results. Hearing Peggy Lee forced to subject her material to a disco beat demonstrates the shabby treatment given some of America’s greatest artists by the demands of the new market place. When Sinatra came back, it was with a new agenda: he planned to leave behind his beloved recording studio and regular releases of albums and instead take his music to the people (including the heartland, which is where I live, in Kenosha, WI). I heard him 4 times in Chicago, once in Madison, Wisconsin and once in Milwaukee (Alpine Valley). Frank’s return–marked by a heavily publicized live telecast (“The Main Event”) from Madison Square Garden with the Woody Herman Band–was admittedly far from reassuring. His voice sounded tired or out-of-practice. But that was the ONLY time out of my numerous cherished moments. Each of his concerts in the Midwest throughout the ’70s and early ’80s was an unforgettable, spellbinding experience–and there was not a SINGLE INSTANT during 6 concerts over the course of 15 years when his voice evidenced any decline (I say this as a professional musician with perfect pitch). Whether sharing the bill with Ella Fitzgerald and Count Basie, with the Buddy Rich Band, or the NY Philharmonic, Frank was superb, bigger than life, the experience of a lifetime, forever etched in memory. And when I caught him at Alpine Valley (the same day as Elvis’ death), he made a last-minute change of programming, announcing: “We’ve lost an old friend, and I’d like to dedicate this number to him.” Of course, the song was “Love Me Tender.”

      I was unable to attend Frank’s final tour, during which an erratic Dean Martin had to be replaced by a hyper-kinetic Liza Minnelli. That may have been the one “shaky performance” among Frank’s many visits to stadiums and amphitheaters in his post-retirement visits to the Midwest. I’ve seen a video-tape of the Detroit concert, and Frank appears rather flustered, while Liza and Sammy Davis, Jr. are running around him in circles (literally!) like a couple of Energizer Bunnies. It was the only tour and concert that I missed–and the only one that may have left a bad aftertaste. There is also (on Youtube) a painful video of a 1990s concert featuring Frank in Barcelona, Spain. Obviously, something went terribly wrong–with the sound or the monitors–because Frank and the Orchestra are performing in different keys! (The video dishonors Frank’s memory, and I wish someone would have it removed!)

    • Samuel Chell January 10, 2017 at 00:21 - Reply

      Comments about Sinatra’s “vocal decline” following his retirement necessarily come from viewers who never attended an Ole Blue concert or who saw him just once–possibly his Sunday night comeback on national television. Just prior to retirement, Frank had tried to meet the new low standard in pop music, which had been taken away from professional composers like Cole Porter and Richard Rodgers and handed over to the new guitar-playing singer-songwriters of the day. It was a “populist revolution,” producing a few scattered gems along with much reductive music, with depressing results to the record sales of “traditional” vocalists like Sinatra (his last couple of albums sold in the hundreds, not tens of thousands, wtih “Watertown” the nadir, imo). Recently, Bob Dylan gave an interview in which he dismissed the music of his own generation as “ephemeral,” insisting that Sinatra’s music and its composers–from Berlin to Van Heusen–represented a lasting high-water mark in American popular culture. Ironically, it was Sinatra’s belief in material by composers prior to his own generation that proved the singlemost important catalyst in the construction of what has come to be known as “The Great American Songbook.”

      Still, the fortunes of “traditional” popular singers had hit the skids by the late1960s. Hearing Peggy Lee forced to subject her recorded voice to an overlaid disco beat demonstrates the shabby treatment given some of America’s greatest artists by the demands of the new marketplace. When Sinatra came back, it was with a new agenda: he planned to leave behind his beloved recording studio and cut back drastically on record albums in favor of taking his music to the people (including the heartland, which is where I live, in Kenosha, WI). I heard him 4 times in Chicago, once in Madison, Wisconsin and once in Milwaukee (Alpine Valley). Frank’s return–marked by a heavily publicized live telecast (“The Main Event”) from Madison Square Garden with the Woody Herman Band–was admittedly far from reassuring. His voice sounded tired or out-of-practice. But that was the ONLY time out of my numerous cherished moments. Each of his concerts in the Midwest throughout the ’70s and early ’80s was an unforgettable, spellbinding experience–and there was not a SINGLE INSTANT during 6 concerts over the course of 15 years when his voice evidenced any decline (I say this as a professional musician with perfect pitch). Whether sharing the bill with Ella Fitzgerald and Count Basie, with the Buddy Rich Band, or the NY Philharmonic, Frank was superb, bigger than life, the experience of a lifetime, forever etched in memory. And when I caught him at Alpine Valley (the same day as Elvis’ death), he made a last-minute change of programming, announcing: “We’ve lost an old friend, and I’d like to dedicate this number to him.” Of course, the song was “Love Me Tender.”

      I was unable to attend Frank’s final tour, during which an erratic Dean Martin had to be replaced by a hyper-kinetic Liza Minnelli. That may have been the one “shaky performance” among Frank’s many visits to stadiums and amphitheaters in his post-retirement visits to the Midwest. I’ve seen a video-tape of the Detroit concert, and Frank appears rather flustered, while Liza and Sammy Davis, Jr. are running around him in circles (literally!) like a couple of Energizer Bunnies. It was the only tour and concert that I missed–and the only one that may have left a bad aftertaste. There is also (on Youtube) a painful video of a 1990s concert featuring Frank in Barcelona, Spain. Obviously, something went terribly wrong–with the sound or the monitors–because Frank and the Orchestra are performing in different keys! (The video dishonors Frank’s memory, and I wish someone would have it removed!)

  2. Paul Gordon November 28, 2011 at 15:40 - Reply

    His voice DID decline (although I LOVE the “Old Blue Eyes Is Back” album), but his concerts were better in the 70s-90’s than his live work of the 40’s-60’s. So, thank God he DID come back!

  3. tonyd August 1, 2012 at 16:49 - Reply

    “ONLY THE LONELY”
    Since there were so many hits on this album on the Forum,here are the facts:

    “Frank Sinatra sings for Only The Lonely” (complete name of album)
    Capitol release-1958-arranged by Nelson Riddle
    1.Only The Lonely
    2.Angel Eyes
    3.What’s New
    4.It’ A Lonesome Old Town
    5.Willow Weep For Me
    6.Good-Bye
    7.Blues In The Night
    8.Guess I’ll Hang My Tears Out To Dry
    9.Ebb Tide
    10.Spring Is Here
    11.Gone With The Wind
    12.One For My Baby
    The original 12 track album was released in monaural.Two years later the stereo albun was released with 2 tracks missing due to lack of space for strereo grooves.
    (It’s A Lonesome Old Town and Spring Is Here)
    The CD release in 1987 had a bonus track-Where Or When
    Recording session details:
    Monday,May 5,1958-8 to 11 pm-Capitol Tower
    Guess I’ll Hang My Tears Out To Dry
    Ebb Tide
    Angel Eyes
    These songs were rejected by Sinatra and never released.
    Thursday,May 29,1958-first session-2 to 5 pm-Capitol Tower-conducted by Felix Slatkin
    Monique-Theme song for 1958 movie “Kings Go Forth”
    Ebb Tide-take 4
    Angel Eyes-take 3
    Spring Is Here
    Second session-8:30 to 11:30 pm
    Guess I’ll Hang My Tears Out To Dry-take 4
    Only The Lonely-take 9
    Lush Life-never completed or released
    Willow Weep For Me-take 4
    Tuesday,June 24,1958-8:30 to 11:30 pm-Capitol Tower-Conducted by Nelson Riddle
    Blues In The Night
    What’s New
    Gone With The Wind
    One For My Baby-(solo piano test take)
    Wednesday,June 25,1958-8:30 to 11:30 pm-Capitol Tower-Conducted by Nelson Riddle
    Goodbye
    It’s A Lonesome Old Town
    One For My Baby-take 1

    Won Grammy Award in 1958 for best album cover.
    When Sinatra was asked “what was his favorite album”-he said without hesitation-Only The Lonely(John Rockwell’s book-Sinatra-An American Classic).
    At the time of the recording Sinatra’s divorce with Ava Gardner was finalized and Nelson Riddle had just lost his mother and daughter.Nelson Riddle-” if I can attach events like that to music….perhaps Only The Lonely was the result.”
    To many Sinatraphils(including me)this was the pairs finest hour.It is one of the finest albums ever recorded,any time,anywhere,by anyone.
    “……truly classic album with classic,perfect orchestrations from Nelson Riddle and Sinatra at the very top of his game,his voice at the peak of perfection.The album is faultless.The concept is faultless and the performance is perfect in every way.
    I listen to it often.

  4. Fritz Bogart August 6, 2012 at 06:21 - Reply

    I understand when people say Frank should have stayed retired in 1971, but I only agree partly. I think he probably shouldn’t have recorded any more studio albums after that point, but he was still a fantastic performer in concert all the way up through the late 80’s.

  5. anne ayres December 22, 2012 at 16:43 - Reply

    Most melancholy of all Frank’s album in my opinion is ‘Where are you’ My husband brought it back from the states in 1958.

  6. Steven January 21, 2015 at 23:00 - Reply

    “She Shot Me Down” (1982) is a great album of new material though. I really love Frank’s sad old man phase, from Cycles (68) to Watertown (72?) and this one.

  7. John A Hicks March 8, 2017 at 17:53 - Reply

    I still think that Sinatra was thew greatest purveyor of a song that has ever lived, he sang like a musician played, he always gave credit to the composer and lyricist of a song, plus the arranger and the orchestra.

    Many of today’s singers would benefit from watching and listening to him sing, particularly one British female singer who you can hear her intake of breath in every line of every song she sings

  8. Nekoemon May 24, 2017 at 16:23 - Reply

    I think Sinatra’s voice improved as he got older. From “Watertown” on, he could convey a true emotion that I hardly find in earlier recordings. The whole “Watertown” is a pure gem. And later, listen to his take on “One Note Samba” or even later “Bang Bang” or “A Long Night”… Compare the eraly version of “Let’s Face The Music & dance”, the 1979 one has much more substance than the young-blue-eyes one. Sinatra singing “Don’t Ever Go Away” gives me wonderful goosebumps. Yeah, thanks god he came back and aged beautifully. And his version of “Bang Bang” is the only one that equals the already perfect of from Vanilla Fudge (in 1967).

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